Japanese cult cinema thread

China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Thailand, etc.
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Unread postby HungFist » 10 Feb 2008, 19:26

Toei March 2008.

早稲田大学 (1953)
空海 (1984)
オーロラの下で (1990)
福沢諭吉 (1991)
わが愛の譜 滝廉太郎物語 (1993)
わが心の銀河鉄道 宮沢賢治物語 (1996)
BE-BOP-HIGHSCHOOL ビー・バップ・ハイスクール (1994)

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Unread postby HungFist » 10 Feb 2008, 19:29

Toei’s April 2008 theme is writer Eiji Yoshikawa

江戸三国志 (1956)
江戸三国志 疾風篇 (1956)
江戸三国志 完結迅雷篇 (1956)
神州天馬侠 (1958)
神州天馬侠 完結篇 (1958)
恋山彦 (1959)
鳴門秘帖 (1961)
鳴門秘帖 完結篇 (1961)

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Unread postby HungFist » 14 Feb 2008, 12:19

Toei May, a kick ass Norifumi Suzuki month:

シルクハットの大親分 (Shiruku hatto no ô-oyabun) (1970)
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シルクハットの大親分 ちょび髭の熊 (Shiruku hatto no ô-oyabun: chobi-hige no kuma) (1970)
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現代ポルノ伝 先天性淫婦 (Modern Porno Tale: Inherited Sex Mania) (1971)
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徳川セックス禁止令 色情大名 (Tokugawa Sex Ban: Lustful Lord) (1972)
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多羅尾伴内 (Tarao Bannai) (1978)
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Thanks for Kemushi at asiandvdguide for heads up

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Unread postby HungFist » 16 Mar 2008, 15:25

Saigo no tokkotai (1970)

Toei Studios’s b/w war film about the Japanese kamikaze pilots in WWII is perhaps the most touching movie I have ever seen. There’s a bit of sentimentialism, but director Junya Sato handles the tragic subject masterfully. The cast is filled with major stars such as Ken Takakura, Bunta Sugawara, Tatsuo Umemiya, Asao Koike and Junko Fuji but they all play their roles extremely well. Especially the lead actor Koji Tsuruta is amazing. Tomisaburo Wakayama and his humoristic character are the only ones that feel slightly out of place. His appearence takes place mostly during the film’s middle third, which is the weakest and least engaging part of the movie. However, the film being this heavy themed it may actually work to the benefit of the film in the end. The last third is even more gripping than the first. Simply one of the best war movies ever made.

The film is available on Toei's unsubbed dvd. The quality is the dvd varies a bit. Some scenes look a bit messy while others look good. It's perfectly watchable and in my opinion the genre (realistic b&w war movie, and very "rare" on the top of that) made it even less of a problem. But while I was never distacted by any of the dvds shortcomings, this does not always look like a film made in 1970.

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Koji Tsuruta
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Ken Takakura
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Tatsuo Umemiya
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Junko Fuji
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Asao Koike
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Shinichi Chiba
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Tomisaburo Wakayama
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Bunta Sugawara
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Last edited by HungFist on 27 Jan 2009, 19:52, edited 1 time in total.

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Unread postby HungFist » 22 Mar 2008, 21:07

Next week there will be a R2J re-release for Yasuhare Hasebe's Fossilized Wilderness (Kaseki no kouya) (化石の荒野) (1982). I don't know anything about the film except that it stars Tsunehiko Watase, Isao Natsuyagi, Eiji Go, Hideo Murota and Jo Shishido, and what cdjapan says about it: "5000 kilos worth of gold disappears at the end of WWII. 36 years later, one man's career reveals the hidden secrets behind the conspiracy."

Here's the VHS cover art (stolen from yahoo)
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Unread postby HungFist » 27 Mar 2008, 14:10

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6/17/2008
Episodes 6-9
180 min

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Unread postby grim_tales » 27 Mar 2008, 16:03

Would I enjoy the LW+C TV show if I like the films Hung? :) (I have the Thai box set).

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Unread postby HungFist » 29 Mar 2008, 21:55

Next up is the Red Peony Gambler series. There’s 8 films in total and Toei has released all of them on dvd. Now, these are the first Toei ninkyo yakuza films I see. In other words, the following comments are written by a total genre beginner. Please, try to bear with me.

Red Peony Gambler (Hibotan bakuto) (1968)

The legendary Junko Fuji stars a wandering female yakuza looking for her father’s murderer in the opening episode of the legendary series. On her journey she meets the film’s most interesting character, a mysterious man played by Ken Takakura, a yakuza legend perhaps even bigger than Fuji. The amount of gambling scenes is smaller than you might expect, but the encounters between the two leads are bigger than life.

Fuji's formal introduction
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Last edited by HungFist on 14 Dec 2008, 11:35, edited 1 time in total.

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Unread postby HungFist » 30 Mar 2008, 12:17

Red Peony Gambler 2: Gambler’s Obligation (Hibotan bakuto: Isshuku ippan) (1968)

Screenwriter Norifumi Suzuki takes over the directorial duties in this superior sequel. Although in 1968 Suzuki was not yet the exploitation maestro he would later be known as, his touch is easy to recognize; the mix of drama, action and occasional silly humour (courtesy of Tomisaburo Wakayama) isn’t too far from some of this 70’s mainsteam films. But of course Red Peony Gambler is a much more elegant production. Fuji is good in the lead role, and although Takakura is gone Koji Tsuruta makes up for it. The villain double Amatsu / Sugawara (looking really young) is excellent.

Female co-star Mari Shiraki on the left
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Wakayama with his usual silly moustache
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Sugawara and Amatsu
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Koji Tsurura
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The famous fight scene that has later been copied to so many other movies
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Last edited by HungFist on 14 Dec 2008, 11:36, edited 1 time in total.

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Unread postby HungFist » 30 Mar 2008, 12:25

Red Peony Gambler 3: Flower Cards Match (Hibotan bakuto: Hanafuda Shobu) (1969)

Takakura skipped the second film but now he’s back and his scenes with Junko Fuji are simply wonderful. But Takakura and Fuji aren’t the only reasons why this movie stands up. Director Tai Kato does excellent job helming classy old school yakuza entertainment that is engaging enough to make you wish the final bloody confrontation would never come.

This young girl would later play an important role in the 5th film
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Junko ready for a fight
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Bad guys Amatsu and Asao Koike (you know him from yakuza and Teruo Ishii movies) on the right
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Legendary actor Kanjuro Arashi
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Classic scene with Fuji and Takakura
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Last edited by HungFist on 18 Jan 2009, 12:34, edited 2 times in total.

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Unread postby HungFist » 30 Mar 2008, 12:40

Red Peony Gambler 4: Second Generation Ceremony (Hibotan bakuto: Nidaime shumei) (1969)

Shigero Ozawa’s (The Street Fighter) instalment differs greatly from the previous three films in terms storyline. This time Oryu (Fuji) promises a dying boss to complete his railroad project for the government. Compared to the storylines of the earlier films this does not feel the most natural move. However, at the latest when Takakura steps into the picture you know you’re watching a great movie. Bin Amatsu, who’s been killed a few times already in the series, returns as yet another new villain. Tomisaburo Wakayama is taking his day off and is replaced by Tatsuo Endo who delivers the comic relief.

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Unread postby HungFist » 30 Mar 2008, 12:48

Red Peony Gambler 5: Notorious Gambler (Hibotan bakuto: Tekkaba retsunden) (1969)

While my limited genre knowledge prevents me from making any definitive statements, I think it would be a pretty safe bet to say this is one of the best yakuza film ever made. Certainly it’s one of the greatest movies of all time in general. The storyline, characters and acting are all perfect. Junko Fuji has become phenomenal in the lead role, and Koji Tsuruta is even better. Tomisaburo Wakayama limits his comedic show to minimum. As usual, the villain is played by Bin Amatsu and even he is better than ever. Amatsu of course takes part in the final duel, which is the best action piece in the series so far. The gambling scenes are superb as well.

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Unread postby HungFist » 30 Mar 2008, 13:47

Red Peony Gambler 6: Oryu Returns (Hibotan bakuto: Oryu sanjo) (1970) – 3/5

Tai Kato, the director of the third film, returns to the series and delivers a direct sequel to Flower Cards Match. Unfortunately the storyline and characters are not quite as good as before, and the film suffers from some sentimentialism. Surprisingly the cast features neither Takakura nor Tsuruta, instead the male lead played by Bunta Sugawara. It’s a pleasure to see him as the good guy for a change, but ultimately his character is given too little screentime. Another unexpected turn is Bin Amatsu. While he is in the film - and evil as usual – he only appears very briefly in a supporting role. The main villain is played by Toru Abe. Wakayama’s brief appearance is one of his best in the series. In the end, although Oryu Returns feels somewhat underwhelming after the masterful fifth film, it’s well worth a watch for genre fans. Appart from the solid cast it also features some worderful single scenes and interesting cinematography (Kato likes to keep the camera very low a lot of the time).

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Last edited by HungFist on 14 Dec 2008, 11:42, edited 1 time in total.

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Unread postby HungFist » 30 Mar 2008, 17:01

Red Peony Gambler 7: Here to Kill You! (Hibotan bakuto: Oinochi Itadaki masu) (1971)

The series made a turn to worse after the pitch-perfect Red Peony Gambler 5. The negative development continues in the sevent film, although it’s not obvious from the great opening sequence. But the rest of the film is a routine effort. With Fuji, Tsuruta and director Tai Kato it’s needless to say it’s still a very decent film, but the execution and storyline just aren’t lively enough to raise the film above average. A the highlight – appart from the beginning - is actually a very funny comedy sequence. It does involve Wakayama, but he’s not even main clown. Very surprising indeed.

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Last edited by HungFist on 21 Jan 2009, 14:34, edited 2 times in total.

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Unread postby HungFist » 30 Mar 2008, 17:24

Red Peony Gambler 8: Execution of Duty (Hibotan bakuto: jingi tooshi masu) (1972)

Red Peony Gambler receives a worthy conclusion in this eighth instalment. While the previous film suffered from one-dimentional characters and flat storyline, this part is the best written film in the entire series. It starts off rather simple, but gets better and better scene by scene as the themes of honor and duty get more complicated. The big fight at the end is perhaps the best action scene in the entire series, followed by an even better ending shot. The supporting cast features Bunta Sugawara and Hiroki Matsukata in honorable good guy roles.

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Last edited by HungFist on 21 Jan 2009, 14:37, edited 2 times in total.

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Unread postby HungFist » 30 Mar 2008, 17:42

The quality of the dvds varies a bit. These are not very recent releases so don’t expect to see Toei’s very best work. The first two films look pretty decent but could be sharper. I recall at least the first film also displaying more edge enhancement that you usually find on Toei dvds. However, it’s still by no means distracting. See the screencaptures yourself.

The third film looks a bit muted till halfway. After that it gets crisper. The fourth film looks and sounds very nice. The fifth film has a fantastic transfer, but the sound is a bit shrill. It’s not distracting, but you can see (hear) that it’s not as good as we’ve come to expect from Toei. The sixth, seventh and especially eighth films looks and sound great.

Extras are the same for all films; original trailer and picture gallery (usually 9 or 10 stills). Teaser trailers are included for parts 2 and 5, and feature behind the scenes footage. All dvds use original poster arts as covers.

Teaser trailer for part 2
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Teaser trailer for part 5
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Still from part 1
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Still from part 5
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Still from part 6
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Last edited by HungFist on 21 Jan 2009, 14:30, edited 2 times in total.

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Unread postby HungFist » 02 Apr 2008, 18:57

And finally, cover arts for all films.

Red Peony Gambler 1 & 2
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Red Peony Gambler 3 & 4
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Red Peony Gambler 5 & 6
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Red Peony Gambler 7 & 8
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Notice how 70s Toei got lazy and used the same pic of Fuji and Sugawara in the posters of the 6th and 8th film.
Last edited by HungFist on 14 Dec 2008, 11:44, edited 1 time in total.

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Unread postby HungFist » 07 Apr 2008, 23:33

Beautiful artwork on the new Scandinavian Shogun Assassin dvd...
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... exept that that the pictures on the backside are mostly from the wrong movies...

And DVD Rama Wild Side Gosha reviews:
http://www.dvdrama.com/rw_fiche-9567-.php
http://www.dvdrama.com/rw_fiche-9570-.php
http://www.dvdrama.com/rw_fiche-9571-.php
http://www.dvdrama.com/rw_fiche-9572-.php
http://www.dvdrama.com/rw_fiche-9573-.php
http://www.dvdrama.com/rw_fiche-9574-.php

Some not work safe.

EDIT: cinemasie, too:
http://www.cinemasie.com/fr/menuSec.php ... 1207087200
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Unread postby grim_tales » 08 Apr 2008, 10:38

I like the 70's style art on Shogun Assassin :)
Is it worth seeing (I know its just a cut/paste job of the 1st two Lone Wolf and Cub films - which I already have the Thai box set of).

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Unread postby HungFist » 08 Apr 2008, 11:34

It depends on how much you worship the originals... Technically speaking Shogun Assassin is excellent. It's a kick ass action packed film with a terrific new soundtrack and kick ass dubbing. I can easily imagine some less dedicated viewers finding it superior to the LW&C films... Myself I've seen all the LW&C films about 17 times so I don't really have need for SA. It's a totally different type of film (more hip and funky), but since I know the footage so well and rate the orig series higher than anything else in the swordplay genre, SA doesn't offer me much more than the new soundtrack and dubbing. If the footage was original, the film would surely be among my favourites.

As related news, Animeigo will be releasing Shogun Assassin 5 (dubbed versions of LW&C 6) on 7/8/2008.

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Unread postby grim_tales » 08 Apr 2008, 14:18

I havent seen them that many times (but do like them, particularly the 1st one) so may check SA out :)

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Unread postby HungFist » 08 Apr 2008, 19:15

Geneon released five Teruo Ishii films on dvd last month. This was very confusing for someone who isn’t familiar with these films and struggles with kanjis, as some of them were already released on R2J in 2001, but by different distributor (Happinet). Those old discs included english subtitles, while the new ones don’t (according to web stores).

The recently released films are the so called ”Line” series. The first three had been released on dvd before in 2001 (now oop). White Line, which has not bee available on dvd previously, is limited to the box set. The other four are available individually.

Black Line 石井輝男 黒線地帯 (1960)
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Yellow Line 石井輝男 黄線地帯 (1960)
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Sexy Line 石井輝男 セクシ-地帯 (1961)
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Fire Line 石井輝男 火線地帯 (1961)
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And the Box Set with all five movies
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The 2001 batch also included one film that was not released this time, 女体桟橋 (1958).

I think I got the english titles paired with correct covers but I can't be 100% sure.
Last edited by HungFist on 15 Dec 2008, 23:34, edited 1 time in total.

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Unread postby HungFist » 13 Apr 2008, 11:30

In June Toei will release four movies directed by Masahiro Makino and starring Koji Tsuruta

次郎長三国志 (1963)
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続次郎長三国志 (1963)
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次郎長三国志 第三部 (1964)
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次郎長三国志 甲州路殴り込み (1964)
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They're also releasing three Eiji Okuda films from the late 90's (plus their usual stuff; recent movies, tv shows, animes etc).

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Unread postby HungFist » 27 Apr 2008, 22:43

Yukio Mishima double from Criterion

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Patriotism (1966)

Synopsis
Playwright and novelist Yukio Mishima foreshadowed his own violent suicide with this ravishing short feature, his only foray into filmmaking, yet made with the expressiveness and confidence of a true cinema artist. All prints of Patriotism (Yûkoku), which depicts the seppuku of a army officer, were destroyed after Mishima's death in 1970, though the negative was saved, and the film resurfaced thirty-five years later. New viewers will be stunned at the depth and clarity of Mishima's vision, as well as his graphic depictions of sex and death. The film is presented here with a choice of Japanese or English intertitles.

Special Features
* - New, restored high-definition digital transfer of the Japanese and English versions, with optional Japanese or English intertitles
* - A 45-minute audio recording of Yukio Mishima speaking to the Foreign Correspondents' Association of Japan
* - A 45-minute making-of documentary, featuring crew from the film's production
* - Interview excerpts featuring Mishima discussing war and death
* - New and improved English subtitle translation
* - PLUS: A new essay by renowned critic and historian Tony Rayns, Mishima's original short story, and Mishima's extensive notes on the film's production

******************

Mishima - A Life in Four Chapters (1985)

Synopsis
Paul Schrader's visually stunning, collagelike portrait of acclaimed Japanese author and playwright Yukio Mishima (played by Ken Ogata) investigates the inner turmoil and contradictions of a man who attempted an impossible harmony between self, art, and society. Taking place on Mishima's last day, when he famously committed public seppuku, the film is punctuated by extended flashbacks to the writer's life as well as by gloriously stylized evocations of his fictional works. With its rich cinematography by John Bailey, exquisite sets and costumes by Eiko Ishioka, and unforgettable, highly influential score by Philip Glass, Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters is a tribute to its subject and a bold, investigative work of art in its own right.

Special Features
* - DIRECTOR-APPROVED SPECIAL EDITION DOUBLE-DISC SET FEATURES
* - New, restored high-definition digital transfer of the director's cut, supervised and approved by director Paul Schrader and cinematographer John Bailey
* - Optional English and Japanese voice-over narrations, the former by Roy Scheider, the latter by Ken Ogata
* - New audio commentary featuring Schrader and producer Alan Poul
* - New video interviews with Bailey, producers Tom Luddy and Mata Yamamoto, composer Philip Glass, and production designer Eiko Ishioka
* - New video interviews with Mishima biographer John Nathan and friend Donald Richie
* - New audio interview with coscreenwriter Chieko Schrader
* - Video interview excerpt featuring Mishima talking about writing
* - The Strange Case of Yukio Mishima, a 55-minute BBC documentary about the author
* - Theatrical trailer
* - PLUS: A booklet featuring a new essay by critic Kevin Jackson, a piece on the film’s censorship in Japan, and photographs of Ishioka's sets

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Unread postby HungFist » 01 May 2008, 13:03

Killer's Mission (Shokin kasegi) (1969)

The Street Fighter director Shigero Ozawa helms a supremely cool samurai spy pic with the one man army Tomisaburo Wakayma in the lead. The main villain is played by none other than Toei’s greatest yakuza baddie Bin Amatsu. Add Koji Tsuruta in a cameo, and female ninjas played by Tomoko Mayama and Yumiko Nogawa, and you know what we’re into; first grade high bodycount entertainment. The only notable weakness is the slow moving 20 min episode that comes after the halfway. The rest is pure retro chambara gold. Also look out for Wakayma making fun of his real life Zatoichi brother.

The German dvd by Eye Catcher is the only release currently available. It features two versions of the film. The first is the German threatrical version. 2.35:1, anamorphic and remastered, dubbed in german with optional german subtitles, and cut down to 72 minutes. Seemed like a good transfer by a quick glance (edit: good remastering, but the compression is poor).

On the same disc we find the uncut version, which runs 85 minutes. In japanese and with optional german and english subtitles, but cropped to approx 1.85:1. Some scenes (say, 5 minutes, pure guess) come from a messy fullscreen source with burnt in english subs. These scenes are however very well edited in to the film as there's no notable audio drop outs, even though some additions come in the middle of a scene with music.

The biggest problem aside cropping is the incredibly shitty compression (uncut version, although the german version fares very poorly on this area as well). I haven't seen anything like this since the 90's Chiba bootlegs by Brentwood. Nevertheless, keep in mind that this is the only release available for the film, so you either buy it, wait for Toei that may never come, or jump out of the window (first and second flood don't count).

Film caps (uncut version)
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DVD quality (highlighting the problems) (uncut version)
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y297/Shurayuki/Shura2/killersmi.png
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y297/Shurayuki/Shura2/killersmi1.png
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http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y297/Shurayuki/Shura2/killersmi3.png
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http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y297/Shurayuki/Shura2/killersmi5.png
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y297/Shurayuki/Shura2/killersmi6.png
Last edited by HungFist on 01 May 2008, 22:12, edited 1 time in total.


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