Japanese cult cinema thread

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Guro Taku
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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby Guro Taku » 21 Jul 2014, 18:43

I wonder if Toei thinks these more recent films will sell better than their catalogue releases from the 70ies... Do you know how well/poorly the older catalogue titles sold in Japan? For a while I was convinced that there are more fans of these films outside Japan than in Japan itself but your recent posts about retrospectives and theaters playing just these old films have changed that. Of course I also was told that Japan is a very rental-oriented country, with very little interest in buying films on DVD. Has that changed to VOD now, explaining why the Toei classics are now relegated to that instead of "proper" DVD releases?

As for the announced titles, LADY BATTLE COP so far remains the only purchase for me. I like Teruo Ishii and Hasebe but painful experience with the V-cinema works of Takashi Ishii (GAKKA NO RAN) and Yuuji Makiguchi (JOROGUMO) has taught me that some directors aren't capeable of excellence under any and all circumstances.

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby HungFist » 21 Jul 2014, 19:09

I doubt VoD affects Toei's business much. We get like 5 films a month, mostly 1950's or early 1960's stuff, and they are all VHS/TV prints. In fact, I think some of them are worse than VHS because there's a crazy amount of ghosing for whatever reason. Non-anamorphic, too, and that can be a nasty thing when you can only play them with Window's Media Player or the servive provoder's own player, which don't have proper zoom functions. I can't imagine it being a major business.

The retrospective screenings seem pretty popular indeed. Some of the theaters are pretty small, like Laputa Asagaya with about 50 seats, but they are often nearly full. I couldn't even see Coed Report: Yuko's White Breasts (1971) because it was sold out (Katagiri and Shiratori were attending the screening). In Sonny Chiba fest (150 seats) there was a good amount of audience in every screening, even though each film was played 7-10 times in total.

It could also be that now that 35mm is disappearing people are getting more interested in catching these films in theaters before it's too late. That's certainly the case for me. Also a good portion of this audience is old men who may feel more comfortable going to cinemas than watching DVDs.

One problem may be that the Toei has oversaturated their own dvd rental market. I live in a city of over 2 million people, yet only about 25% of Toei's new catalogue releases were ever carried by the rental stores. I can understand that, too. They've already got 50 Ken Takakura films and 30 Bunta Sugawara films in the shelf. No space left - and maybe not enough customers either.

I think the idea with the V-Cinema releases is that they're trying to advertise it as a kind of event. It should only be 2 large batches. So it's kind of special. There's going to be a V-Cinema retro in Laputa as well. But I really hope they will get back to 70's titles again some day.

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby Guro Taku » 21 Jul 2014, 19:22

HungFist wrote:One problem may be that the Toei has oversaturated their own dvd rental market.

That makes a lot of sense. Kind of like what Geneon did when they pumped out dozens of Nikkatsu roman porno titles within a few months. It was like a decade worth of Christmases for me but even I only cherry-picked the titles I was really interested in and ignored the rest. Toei has been less excessive with the amount of titles released each month so it makes sense they lasted that much longer before oversaturating the market. Like I said earlier, I am really glad they got around to most of what I desperately wanted on DVD but it's still a shame they stopped.

I also think they made a huge mistake to only do standard-definition transfers for their catalogue titles. The future is high definition and people won't settle for TV/VHS prints. They mostly already don't and they certainly won't in the future. If they had gone high-definition from the beginning it would have cost more but they could have milked their transfers for a DVD release and a Blu-ray upgrade down the line. Now they'll have to create an entirely new transfer and that's just not bloody likely in the case of most of these films.

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby HungFist » 04 Aug 2014, 05:29

The second batch of V-Cinema titles has been added to the website
- http://www.toei-video.co.jp/vcinema/index.html

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby FullCream » 10 Nov 2014, 01:17

I NEED to get all the Furyo Bancho DVDs with English subs. Can anyone help me?

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby FullCream » 10 Nov 2014, 01:32

Actually - is there a one-stop shop for Toei English subbed stuff. Would like Lady Battle Cop and a WHOLE LOT of others

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby HungFist » 10 Nov 2014, 03:07

The Toei dvds never come with subs. Of course a small number of their films have had a legit release in different countries, and a few may have fansubs floating around the internet, but that's it. Well, aside some bootlegs maybe.

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby HungFist » 25 Nov 2014, 16:02

Toei has announced Takakura BDs...

Abashiri Prison BD Box Set I
- Films 1-5
- March 13, 2015

Brutal Tales of Chivalry BD Box Set I
- Films 1-5
- May 13, 2015

Abashiri Prison BD Box Set II
- Films 6-10
- June 10, 2015

Brutal Tales of Chivalry BD Box Set I
- Films 6-9
- July 8, 2015

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby HungFist » 06 Dec 2014, 10:12

More BDs from Toei

Detective Story TV series BD Box Set
- 2015/03/13
- http://www.toei-video.co.jp/BD/tantei.html

New Battles without Honor and Humanity BD Box Set
- Films 1-3
- 2015/04/08
- http://www.allcinema.net/prog/show_dvd. ... sid=942838

Cops vs. Thugs (1975)
- 2015/04/08
- http://www.allcinema.net/prog/show_dvd. ... sid=942840

New Battles without Honor and Humanity: Aftermath (1979)
- 2015/05/13
- http://www.allcinema.net/prog/show_dvd. ... sid=942839

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby HungFist » 06 Dec 2014, 18:48

Here are all the 4K Scan BDs Kadokawa has released

Resurrection of the Golden Wolf (1979)
The Beast Must Die (1980)
Sailor Suit and Machine Gun (1980) (BD review here: viewtopic.php?f=19&t=3388&start=21 )
The Girl who Leapt Through Time (1982)
Fancy Dance (1989) (also in a box set)
Sumo Do, Sumo Don't (1992) (also in a box set)
Shall We Dance? (1996) (also in a box set)

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby Gaijin84 » 08 Dec 2014, 15:58

So we had to wait for Takakura-san's death to get Blu-ray releases of his top films.... :?

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby HungFist » 09 Dec 2014, 16:31

HungFist wrote:More BDs from Toei

Detective Story TV series BD Box Set
- 2015/03/13
- http://www.toei-video.co.jp/BD/tantei.html

New Battles without Honor and Humanity BD Box Set
- Films 1-3
- 2015/04/08
- http://www.allcinema.net/prog/show_dvd. ... sid=942838

Cops vs. Thugs (1975)
- 2015/04/08
- http://www.allcinema.net/prog/show_dvd. ... sid=942840

New Battles without Honor and Humanity: Aftermath (1979)
- 2015/05/13
- http://www.allcinema.net/prog/show_dvd. ... sid=942839


And one more Takakura set, simply called "Takakura Ken Leading Roles: Toei Selection", coming 2015/04/08
- Bullet Train (1975)
- Winter's Flower (1978)
- Dôran (1980)
- Railroad Man (1999)
- The Firefly (2001)

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby HungFist » 01 Apr 2015, 09:43

Another review I found in my files that I believe I've never posted. I must have written this more than 4 years ago because I sold the DVD in 2011 or 2012...

Bara no hyoteki (Target) (1980)

Yusaku Matsuda made one of his biggest hits with the hugely popular but somewhat underwhelming series of Yugi/Game –action films (1978-1979). After the final installment in 1979, Toei Central and director Toru Murakawa went on to deliver another film in the same vein, this time starring rocker turned actor Hiroshi Tachi.

Much like with the Matsuda trilogy, the film is a sloppily written action drama selling itself with stylish poster and charismatic star. It even has a Matsuda cameo, and a theatrical trailer that utilized the exact same still photos technique that was used for Matsuda’s The Execution Game (1979) trailer.

The storyline follows a double-crossed conman (Tachi) who goes after what rightfully belongs to him after being released from prison. Typical to Toei Central productions, action scenes are few and far between, and the film assumes cliché melodrama is enough to hold the viewer’s interest.

Leading star Tachi is the film’s asset. Tachi gave several good performances in the late 70’s, including school gang boss in Classroom of Terror, and a wounded gangster in Hell’s Angels: Red Roar, where his charisma and intensity overcame his somewhat limited repertoire. Bara no hyoteki is no exception.

Overall Bara no hyoteki is by no means a terrible film – it’s just an underwhelming one. It’s a relic from the era when Toei’s action cinema was moving away from the exploitative 70’s mayhem, yet did not quite manage to compensate the lack of action with good storylines or interesting characters.

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Trailer (superb):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYjyOT2td7U

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby HungFist » 17 Jun 2015, 16:41

No DVD of this, but some might be interested:

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Wicked Kempo (1974)

This is one of the numerous karate films Toei produced after The Street Fighter (which itself was a response to Bruce Lee's popularity) turned out a success. Unlike The Street Fighter, though, it's a period film. The film opens really good. Tsunehiko Watase plays a bodyguard for a hire, a real asshole kind of guy who only helps others for money. He lands himself in jail after beating two military policemen, but is then hired by the government to eliminate gangsters who are selling state secrets to foreign powers.

Watase was not really a martial artist, but he did have a bit of karate background from his university times. This was his only starring role in a martial arts movie; he's more often seen as lead actor, co-lead or supporting player in yakuza films (e.g. Wandering Ginza Butterfly, Okinawa Yakuza War, Violent Panic: The Big Crash, Salor Suit and Machine Gun etc.). He's quite alright in the fight scenes, which are pure Chiba-school badassery (e.g. he throws a guy trough a window, then pulls him back up for a series of punches, and finally breaks his neck has he's lying on the ground).

Unfortunately the film pairs him with two useless sidekicks who steal screentime from him during and between fight scenes, and throws in some dumb comedy and silly melodrama. Despite the historical setting and Shaw Bros. style character introductions the film just doesn't feel as epic as it should. Director Shigero Ozawa, who was a prominent yakuza film director in the 1960s, did much better the following year with the excellent martial arts biopic The Defensive Power of Aikido (1975). Wicked Kempo falls somewhere between The Defensive Power of Aikido and his earlier karate-violence classic The Street Fighter, sharing a bit with both of them, but not succeeding so well at either style.

Some of the supporting cast is great, though. For once, regular karate film villain Masashi Ishibashi gets to play a good guy. Ishibashi was a real life karate master who taught Sonny Chiba and visited Masutatsu Oyama's dojo as a quest instructor every now and then (on his way home from work, they say). He had been working on TV and movies as drama actor for a few years before he collaborated with Chiba in the second Bodyguard Kiba movie in 1973, and the rest is history. He went on to play villains in countless Chiba and Shihomi films and also often worked on the choreography together with Chiba.

Wicked Kempo is not a bad film overall - it certainly has its violent charm - but it's not one of the best movies in the Japanese karate film genre either. Fans of the genre should take a look if they have a chance; others can focus on the better films like the Masutatsu Oyama trilogy, The Killing Machine, The Defensive Power of Aikido, The Street Fighter etc.

A few screencaps from a Japanese VoD version:

Watase
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Ishibashi
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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby HungFist » 06 Aug 2015, 15:36

Please, please, please, let this be a new start! After a two year break from catalogue releases, Toei is releasing three yakuza films by Shigero Ozawa on DVD November 11.

Gambler Life Stories (Bakuto retsuden) (博徒列伝) (1968)
Starring: Koji Tsuruta, Tomisaburo Wakayama, Junko Fuji, Ken Takakura, Bunta Sugawara
- http://www.allcinema.net/prog/show_dvd. ... sid=968323

Chivalrous Man's Life Story (Toseinin retsuden) (渡世人列伝) (1969)
Starring: Koji Tsuruta, Tomisaburo Wakayama, Junko Fuji, Ken Takakura
- http://www.allcinema.net/prog/show_dvd. ... sid=968324

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Biography of a Chivalrous Man (Yukyo retsuden) (遊侠列伝) (1970)
Starring: Ken Takakura, Junko Fuji, Kanjuro Arashi
- http://www.allcinema.net/prog/show_dvd. ... sid=968325

These are parts 2-4 in the series. Part 1 (dir. Masahiro Makino) was already released years ago. Part 5 remains unavailable (dir. Kosaku Yamashita)

Now I'm just praing Toei will release some more Sonny Chiba treasures some day, especially my all time favorite Chiba film Wolfguy: Enraged Lycanthrope (1975), other gems like Army Intelligence 33 (1968) and some that I've never seen but really want to, e.g. the Yakuza Wolf films and the Narcotics / Prostitution G-Men (aka A Narcotics Agent's Ballad) films and many others.

I think now would be a good time to send Toei a message and order some Toei DVDs.

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby HungFist » 09 Aug 2015, 15:48

I finally got round to buying and watching the Girls' Junior High School series... mini-reviews to follow.

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Girls' Junior High School: Dangerous Games (1970)

Nikkatsu's lesser know bad girl series lacks the excessive sex and violence of its Toei contemporaries, which is only fitting for the series being set in a junior high school. There's no lack of bad behaviour, though, from frequent delinquent antics to shower room fights and strip gambling (none resulting in anything more than girls in underwear). Junko Natsu stars as a new student who enter a school where the girls are framing their poor teachers for rape and hanging out with a silly a yakuza gang running a strip club. There's a lot of good stuff going on during the first half, but the film somewhat runs out of steam towards the end. Also, it should be mentioned the film is just as much a comedy and drama as it is a bad girl flick. Still, it comes with many good moments, plenty of nostalgia, and an excellent, energetic turn by Natsu.

Enter Junko Natsu
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Chieko Matsubara, who was a prominent Nikkatsu star the 1960s and is still acting in TV
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Jiro Okazaki as silly yakuza
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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby Marshall » 09 Aug 2015, 17:32

Glad you got a chance to check these out. I enjoyed them a lot. Thanks for the caps and comments. Looking forward to more.

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby HungFist » 10 Aug 2015, 10:34

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Girls' Junior High School: Trouble at Graduation (1970)

This second film in the series was released mere five weeks after the original - and oddly enough, produced by a different studio (Academy Pro). The latter may explain why the supporting cast is mostly different, while the former is likely the reason why the film isn't all that good. This time the girls are given homework regarding sex education, which results in a couple of fun but not-all-that-naughty jokes. The film mostly plays out like a mediocre schoolgirls coming-of-age comedy. There's a bit of anarchy at the climax when the girls let the teachers have what they deserve, but this scene too pales in comparison to what would come in Toei's exploitation films in just a few years. The real highlights are the opening scene and a great montage later on, both utilizing the terrific song 'Seishun no uta' by Takuro Yoshida. Director Yukihiro Sawada had a talent for creating that kind of cool scenes, as evidenced by several other films he made (e.g. Melody of Rebellion, 1970; Sex Hunter: Wet Target, 1972; Assault, 1976).

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Takuro Yoshida
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Sukeban montage
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In case anyone is wondering what the DN logo at beginning of each of these films stands for, that's Dainichi. Dainichi was a distribution company joint venture by Daiei and Nikkatsu. Both companies were facing financial trouble in the early 70s, and probably because the standard back then was to release films as double features, they thought it would be a good idea to join forces. They would be able to distribute double features that contain Nikkatsu and Daiei films rather than trying to produce enough films alone to make a Nikkatsu double feature or Daiei double feature. Obviously the attempt failed: Nikkatsu shifted to Roman Porno in late 1971, and Daiei went bankrupt around the same time.

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby HungFist » 11 Aug 2015, 10:21

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Girls' Junior High School: Too Young to Play Like This (1970)

The last film in the series is a slight improvement over the previous movie. This one, too, is pretty much a schoolgirl drama/comedy from start to finish with little in terms of bad girl action. The most amusing part involves three school boys sneaking into the girls' bathing facilities. There's a highly politically incorrect (by modern standards) joke when a big breasted girl gets up from the bath tub and a subtitle saying "15 years old, and she's got such big..." appears. Another good, and completely ridiculous, sketch features the girls fooling two teachers into believing the other person's got a crush on him/her. Star Junko Natsu also gets her share of the cameraman's love, especially during the last 15 minutes, which feature plenty of idol-like footage of her walking on the streets. Despite these strengths, however, the film isn't all that exciting and far outstays its welcome even at just 82 minutes. But, you gotta love the title!

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The DVDs by Nikkatsu look fine other than being interlaced (odd for a 2013 release). My screen captures somehow look a little inferior; I may have screwed up some compression setting, or maybe I'm just imagining things. The DVDs include original trailers as well as cast and crew info. There's also a Junko Natsu interview divided into three parts, apparently conducted via phone because there's no video footage other than clips from the films. The DVD covers are not reversible, btw. Original artwork would have been preferable. There's also a photo booklet which is a box set exclusive but frankly, unless you're a huge fan I don't think you would miss it so much. The box set design, while ok, isn't that special in my opinion either.

I'd probably recommend purchasing the first film first, and then deciding whether to get the rest or not, unless you think these films sound exactly like your cup of tea. I already sold my DVD set, but if I had owned the stand alone releases, I probably would have kept the first film.

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby HungFist » 13 Aug 2015, 16:18

ok, I admit, this looks sweet.

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UK Release Date: 16th November 2015
US Release Date: 17th November 2015
Region: A+B/1+2

Synopsis:

Kinji Fukasaku (Battle Royale) gave the world Japan’s answer to The Godfather with this violent yakuza saga, influencing filmmakers from Quentin Tarantino (Kill Bill, Reservoir Dogs) to Takashi Miike (Graveyard of Honor, Audition). Made within just two years, the five-film series brought a new kind of realism and ferocity to the crime genre in Japan, revitalizing the industry and leading to unprecedented commercial and critical success.

Literally exploding onscreen with a mushroom cloud, and ending with Hiroshima’s A-bomb Dome, the epic story of Battles Without Honor and Humanity follows over 100 characters through twenty years of gang wars, alliances, betrayals, and assassinations, in an exciting exploration of criminal power and politics in Japan. In the opening episode, ex-soldier Shozo Hirono escapes from the post-war black markets to become a key member of the Yamamori gang, but soon finds himself disillusioned by the selfish duplicity of his bosses. Hiroshima Death Match focuses on a demobilized kamikaze pilot drifting through the early 1950’s, whose suicidal impulses find good use as a mob assassin. Proxy War and Police Tactics form a labyrinthine, two-part story of ambition and betrayal set against Japan’s rapid economic growth of the 1960’s, with Shozo caught between warring factions. Final Episode concludes the series in the 1970’s as the former Yamamori gang transforms itself into an economic conglomerate called the Tensei Group, in a bid for mainstream respectability.

Fukasaku and his team broke with the longstanding studio tradition of casting marquee idols as honorable, kimono-clad heroes, defending their gang bosses against unscrupulous villains, and instead adapted true accounts torn from the headlines, shot in a documentary-like style, and with few clear-cut heroes or villains. The vibrancy and dynamism of the filmmaking, plus its shocking violence, Shakespearean plotlines, and wide tapestry of characters, launched a revolutionary new genre, establishing the series as one of the great masterpieces of world crime cinema.

LIMITED EDITION CONTENTS

- Limited Edition Blu-ray Collection
- High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard Definition DVD presentation of all five original films
- Original Mono audio (uncompressed PCM on the Blu-rays)
- Optional English subtitles for all five films
- Remembering Kinji – a new featurette about director Kinji Fukasaku and his work, featuring interviews with Kenta Fukasaku and film critic and Fukasaku biographer Sadao Yamane
- Secrets of the Piranha Army – a new documentary about the troupe of supporting actors who appeared throughout the series, featuring new interviews with original Piranha members Masaru Shiga and Takashi Noguchi, plus second-generation Piranha, Takashi Nishina and Akira Murota
- All the Bad Guys – a new, comprehensive video guide to the actors in the films
- Fukasaku Family – a new interview with Proxy War and Police Tactics assistant director Toru Dobashi
- Man of Action – a new interview with series fight choreographer Ryuzo Ueno
- Tales of a Bit Player – a new interview with supporting actor and stuntman Seizo Fukumoto
- Last Days of the Boss – a new interview with Final Episode screenwriter Koji Takada
- Yakuza Graveyard – a new interview with Takashi Miike about Kinji Fukasaku and the yakuza film genre
- Original trailers for the series
- Original poster gallery for the series
- Limited Edition packaging and reversible sleeves for all five films including original and newly commissioned artwork by Reinhard Kleist

THE COMPLETE SAGA [LIMITED EDITION EXCLUSIVE]

- English-subtitled premiere of the 224-minute compilation edition of the first four films, previously screened only as part of a limited Japanese theatrical release in 1980 and on the Toei cable channel
- Introduction by Complete Saga editorial supervisor Toru Dobashi

THE YAKUZA PAPERS [LIMITED EDITION EXCLUSIVE]

150-page hardback book featuring writing on the history of the yakuza film genre, the background and continuing importance of the Battles series, and additional essays on the men who made them, including a newly-reprinted and fully annotated edition of Paul Schrader’s classic 1974 Film Comment essay Yakuza-Eiga: A Primer, a new, exclusive English translation of screenwriter Kazuo Kasahara’s 1974 Scenario magazine essay on his writing process for the first four films, as well as new essays and interviews from critics and authors Chris D., Grady Hendrix, Patrick Macias, Tom Mes, Mark Schilling, and Jasper Sharp.

UK LIMITED TO 2000 UNITS
US LIMITED TO 3000 UNITS

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby Guro Taku » 13 Aug 2015, 22:15

I'm really digging all those box sets Arrow is releasing recently. Immediately went and preordered this one as well. I'm curious how the films will benefit from high definition. All DVD versions I have seen (including the ones released by Toei in Japan) were pretty rough looking, which most likely reflects the director's intent and the circumstances of their production.

Since they licensed YAKUZA PAPERS, do you think the odds are good they will also finally bring us all the ABASHIRI PRISON films in one or two box sets? Unlike YAKUZA PAPERS that series hasn't had numerous subtitled releases already so it'd be truly outstanding for them to keep the Toei HD train rolling. And I guess ABASHIRI is a more likely candidate than the TORAKKU YAROU! series...

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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby HungFist » 14 Aug 2015, 04:27

To be honest, I don't see why they would release the Abashiri Prison series. It's a very long (10+9 films), uneven series, largely popular in Japan because of Ken Takakura who doesn't enjoy the same kind of popularity in the West. As for stuff like Abashiri, releasing a small box with the best films from several different series ala Panick House's Pinky Violence set could be an interesting idea.

I mentioned in the other topic that Toei actually has lots of HD masters for films no one has ever released even on DVD (e.g. Sonny Chiba films such as Yakuza Deka 3 & 4 and both Bodyguard Kiba films). I really with they would release my favourite Chiba film Wolfguy: Enraged Lycanthrope as well as films I never managed to see such as the Yakuza Wolf films or the Prostitution / Narcotics G-Men (aka Narcotic's Agent's Lullaby) films.

Marshall wrote:Someone will have to let me know how MELODY OF REBELLION is. Maybe a trailer will turn up?


I saw it a few months ago:

Melody of Rebellion (1970) [35mm]
A mediocre yakuza film starring Yoshio Harada as an outlaw who teams up with other rebels after his yakuza clan has disbanded. There's a great series of moody scenes that capture some of that 1970s nostalgia via music and images - something director Yukihiro Sawada was really good at - in the middle of the film. Otherwise it's a bit underwhelming movie with some comedic scenes, some serious ones, and not very much consistency to any of it. The supporting cast is great, e.g. Tatsuya Fuji, Takeo Chii and Meiko Kaji, but their roles are forgettable. Harada, too, would've deserved a better film. He was a charismatic badass comparable to Yusaku Matsuda, but he ended up in mediocre movies way too often.


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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby HungFist » 10 Sep 2015, 18:53

HungFist wrote:Please, please, please, let this be a new start! After a two year break from catalogue releases, Toei is releasing three yakuza films by Shigero Ozawa on DVD November 11.

Gambler Life Stories (Bakuto retsuden) (博徒列伝) (1968)
Starring: Koji Tsuruta, Tomisaburo Wakayama, Junko Fuji, Ken Takakura, Bunta Sugawara
- http://www.allcinema.net/prog/show_dvd. ... sid=968323

Chivalrous Man's Life Story (Toseinin retsuden) (渡世人列伝) (1969)
Starring: Koji Tsuruta, Tomisaburo Wakayama, Junko Fuji, Ken Takakura
- http://www.allcinema.net/prog/show_dvd. ... sid=968324

Biography of a Chivalrous Man (Yukyo retsuden) (遊侠列伝) (1970)
Starring: Ken Takakura, Junko Fuji, Kanjuro Arashi
- http://www.allcinema.net/prog/show_dvd. ... sid=968325


There's more coming

December 6

Modern Yakuza: Outlaw's Code (現代やくざ 与太者の掟) (1969)
Director: Yasuo Furuhata
Cast: Bunta Sugawara, Tomisaburo Wakayama, Junko Fuji

Modern Yakuza: Outlaw's Honor and Humanity (現代やくざ 与太者仁義) (1969)
Director: Yasuo Furuhata
Cast: Bunta Sugawara, Ryo Ikebe, Fumio Watanabe

Modern Yakuza: Loyalty Offering Breakdown (現代やくざ 盃返します) (1971)
Director: Kiyoshi Saeki
Cast: Bunta Sugawara, Hiroki Matsukata, Yumiko Nogawa, Asao Koike

These are parts 1, 2 and 4 in the series. I'm not sure why Toei skipped part 3. Parts 6 (Street Mobster) and 7 (Three Maddog Brothers) have already been released years ago.

January 6, 2016

Third Generation Yamaguchi Gang (山口組三代目) (1973)
Director: Kosaku Yamashita
Cast: Ken Takakura, Bunta Sugawara, Tetsuro Tamba

Third Generation Boss (三代目襲名) (1974)
Director: Shigero Ozawa
Cast: Ken Takakura, Tetsuro Tamba, Noboru Ando, Tsunehiko Watase

True Account of the Yamaguchi Gang: Life-and-Death Operations on Kyushu (aka Tattooed Hitman) (山口組外伝 九州進攻作戦) (1974)
Director: Kosaku Yamashita
Cast: Bunta Sugawara, Tsunehiko Watase, Tatsuo Umemiya, Tetsuro Tamba, Hiroki Matsukata

Image Image Image

Here's an old VHS cover for Tattooed Hitman:
Image

Toei's release will of course contain the original Japanese version. The US is missing a lot of footage.

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HungFist
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Re: Japanese cult cinema thread

Unread postby HungFist » 17 Sep 2015, 04:40

HungFist wrote:December 6

Modern Yakuza: Outlaw's Code (現代やくざ 与太者の掟) (1969)
Director: Yasuo Furuhata
Cast: Bunta Sugawara, Tomisaburo Wakayama, Junko Fuji

Modern Yakuza: Outlaw's Honor and Humanity (現代やくざ 与太者仁義) (1969)
Director: Yasuo Furuhata
Cast: Bunta Sugawara, Ryo Ikebe, Fumio Watanabe

Modern Yakuza: Loyalty Offering Breakdown (現代やくざ 盃返します) (1971)
Director: Kiyoshi Saeki
Cast: Bunta Sugawara, Hiroki Matsukata, Yumiko Nogawa, Asao Koike


Artworks:

Image Image Image

HungFist wrote:
Gambler Life Stories (Bakuto retsuden) (博徒列伝) (1968)
Starring: Koji Tsuruta, Tomisaburo Wakayama, Junko Fuji, Ken Takakura, Bunta Sugawara
- http://www.allcinema.net/prog/show_dvd. ... sid=968323

Chivalrous Man's Life Story (Toseinin retsuden) (渡世人列伝) (1969)
Starring: Koji Tsuruta, Tomisaburo Wakayama, Junko Fuji, Ken Takakura
- http://www.allcinema.net/prog/show_dvd. ... sid=968324

Biography of a Chivalrous Man (Yukyo retsuden) (遊侠列伝) (1970)
Starring: Ken Takakura, Junko Fuji, Kanjuro Arashi
- http://www.allcinema.net/prog/show_dvd. ... sid=968325


Image Image Image


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